Revit Reinforcement – Keeping a check on Bar Marks

Since 2015 Revit has provided the Rebar Number which automatically assigns bar marks to all reinforcing within the project making use of the partitions to generate a suitable bar mark.

revit-reinforcement-number-and-partition

This is of course a very useful feature and does provide an efficient method of bar marking. However, if you have then issued the model and need to make further changes to the model then you probably do not want the Rebar Numbers (Bar Marks) to change and of course, being automated this can happen.

A safe way of working is to use Dynamo to automatically synchronise the Rebar Number to the Schedule Mark (this was the method of bar marking prior to Revit 2015). This will obviously only be run prior to the issue of the drawings/model to keep a record of the bar marks.

If the Rebar Number does not equal the Schedule mark then we can take ‘manual’ control to rectify the problems.

Here is my Dynamo Script below.

dynamo-sync-rebar-number-to-schedule-mark

It is a very simple routine that selects all the Structural Rebar in the project, gets the Rebar Number and then sets the parameter Schedule Mark with this value.

The next stage is to check that the marks are in synchronisation. To check for this we can use another Dynamo script. For this example I will explain a few stages as we need to use some logical checks and filtering of lists.

The first stage is to create a new shared parameter for the check. This needs to be a Yes/No parameter as shown below.

barmarksync-shared-parameter

Next we will add this parameter to the project so Revit understands which category this applies. Notice that the parameter will need to be an Instance and applied to the Structural Rebar Category (Feel free to add others such as fabric etc.)

barmarkcheck-project-parameter

You can now build the Dynamo Definition to check the Rebar number and schedule mark are in synchronisation. Start by selecting all the Structural Rebar elements as shown below.

rebarsync1

The next step gets the Schedule Mark and the Rebar Number and then checks to see if these values are equal. The output is a Boolean (true or false). Notice that one of these values is returning a false value.

rebarsync2

The true or false lists are then evaluated by the List>filterByBoolMask. The list input is from all the Structural Rebar Elements and the mask is the Boolean output from the == node. The list is then split into two, one list for false and another for true. Finally the parameter “BarMarkSync” is then set to true or false with the use of the Boolean node.

rebarsync3

To test this you can manually set some of the Schedule Marks to different values and then set up a Revit schedule to show the out of sync marks with conditional formatting as shown below. Another method could be to use filters to show the out of sync bar marks on a model view.

schedule-conditional-format

I hope some of you will try this tutorial if you are currently using Revit to produce Reinforcement  models and schedules.

LawrenceH.

Revit Structure & Dynamo – Piled Wall Systems Tutorial

When creating Piled wall systems within Revit you either have to create a structural wall and then 2D detail this in plan to look like a piled wall system or more commonly place each male and female pile and at best, use the array or copy commands. Although this is not too complex for linear piling it can get quite time consuming when curves and turns are encountered within the path.

Link to video: https://youtu.be/EWsMnTbkIWE

Piled wall systems with Revit and Dynamo

Dynamo does provide a very neat solution to this problem and could also be used for sheet piling as well as secant and contiguous systems. In this example I have created a chain of model lines which represents the path of the piling in plan. I then project these lines onto the surface which gives the correct Z levels. The path is then divided into segments and each coordinate pair is then extracted from this list. Finally an adaptive component is placed at each set of coordinates.

This tutorial starts with a quick look at the anatomy of an adaptive component. Adaptive components are very useful when you need to control the placement of elements along a path and have the element rotate to stay aligned. A good example of this is sheet piling.Revit Sheet Piling - Connected clasps

The Adaptive Sheet Pile is basically a standard foundation family that is nested into an adaptive component template. The below image shows the nested family and the adaptive points that control the placement of the pile.Adaptive Component

The first stage is to create a path for you piling layout, in this example I have done this with Model lines. Start Dynamo and then create a new workspace.
The first section of the dynamo graph will allow the user to create a selection of model lines. The Element Curves node will get all the curves/lines within the selections. The list is then flattened and the individual curves/lines are joined into a single poly curve. The last node reports on the total curve length.Sheet Piling with Dynamo - Select model elements

The next stage is to get a selection of your topography and then convert this into a poly surface. The node I have used below if the Python implementation which is much faster than the original conversion tool. (This is found in the Spring Nodes package).

You can then take the surface and the joined curve from the top example and then project this onto the poly surface (Your Topograpghy). Note that the Vector.ZAxis simply projects down the Z axis.Sheet Piling with Dynamo - Get topo

The graph should now look similar to the below image.

Sheet Piling with Dynamo - first part of graph

We now take the new poly curve and divide this into a series of points. In my case the sheet pile in 900mm from point to point. I want to have a start and end point for each pile so I am simply going to divide this by 2.

Sheet Piling with Dynamo - Code Blocks

I have now created a Code Block to divide the curve length into the half distance of my sheet pile.Sheet Piling with Dynamo - Create the Divisions

This will of course create a real number (65.4950), what we need is to round this value down to the nearest integer (65). The output of this is then used to divide the curve into the required number of points. The output of the Points node now contains all the coordinates.

Sheet Piling with Dynamo - create the division Points

These coordinates need to be split into pairs. The List.Chop will then create pairs but if there is a single coordinate left then the Adaptive Component will fail to be placed. The filter looks at the length of the sub lists and then only gets the lists that have more than one set of coordinates.Sheet Piling with Dynamo - Split into Pairs

This is more of a high level overview of the process and the Dynamo script but I will do a video showing and explaining each stage.

LawrenceH

Revit Space Trusses using AutoCAD and Dynamo

Way back in 2011 I wrote an article on the use of AutoCAD and Revit Structure to create a space truss structure. This was using AutoCAD meshes to facet a smooth lofted surface and then involved picking each line and converting these into structural members. At the time this was a valid workflow but, five years on and with the introduction of Dynamo we now have much quicker, productive and robust method to create 3D trusses or space frames.

https://revitstructureblog.wordpress.com/2011/11/09/engineering-the-impossible-with-the-revit-structure-suite/

Revit Strcuture Roof Geometry

In this tutorial I will just outline the main toolsets and processes used to create the above space truss. You will need the following software before you can attempt the tutorial:

  • Autodesk Revit 2016
  • Autodesk AutoCAD
  • Autodesk Dynamo 9.1
  • Lunchbox Package for Dynamo

The geometry is first created in AutoCAD as a polyline curve as shown below. The front curves are mirrored and then copied to the rear 50 meters back.

AutoCAD Roof Profile

You can then create some arcs on the side of the roof structure and then create a lofted surface. Your AutoCAD model will then look similar to the below image.

AutoCAD Geometry.jpg

The real fun then begins in Revit and Dynamo. Here is what the finished graph looks like! As you can see there won’t be scope to create a full, click by click tutorial on this but I will produce a video tutorial if there is enough demand!

Dynamo Graph

The first step is to start a new Revit Structure project and start Dynamo. You then need to import the AutoCAD wireframe. I used the centre of the roof structure as the origin and inserted this Origin to Origin.

You then need to select this geometry in dynamo and then generate dynamo faces from the AutoCAD surface. The dynamo surfaces are then passed into the LunchBox Space Truss node. This creates all the line work and the faceting strategy for the top and bottom chords as well as the braces. Notice that you can also set the truss depth. I have chosen to utilise sliders for all these operations.

Dynamo Graph - Selecting the AutoCAD geometry

Once the centre lines are generated then you can start to assign structural members. This is done with the following. I have used a level to associate the members and then a structural framing type node to select different CHS members for each structural system.

Dynamo Graph - Adding Structural Framing to the curves

The next step is to add some information into the members. I have set the Z justification to centre and also set some type comments so I can filter specific systems within Revit. Of course you could also number the members using dynamo as well!

Dynamo Graph - Setting the instance parameters for the structural framing.jpg

You will then have a space truss. You can of course then edit the structure within AutoCAD and then the new members will generate.

All in all a much quicker and more productive workflow!

LawrenceH

Modelling Piling from Microsoft Excel using Revit & Dynamo

Happy New Year to everyone and straight back into the deep end with more Dynamo! Way back in 2013 I reviewed the Excel Model generation tool that allowed the creation of Revit elements based on a spreadsheet. This allowed the modelling of various objects but was limited to generation of only geometry and did not allow the user to add data to the objects.

Link to YouTube Video: YouTube Tutorial

Revit Piling from Dynamo and Excel

I used this tool to create a Revit piling layout derived from AutoCAD geometry. See Post Below.

https://revitstructureblog.wordpress.com/2013/03/17/modelling-revit-piling-from-microsoft-excel/

I have since used Dynamo to achieve a better method for the setting out of piling as well as setting the Pile number and even loading.

In this post I will step you through the Dynamo node so that you can create a similar routine. Let’s start with the raw Excel data. In my example I have the Pile Number, the Easting and Northing Coordinates, the Level, Depth (Length of Pile) and the Pile Diameter.Excel - Piling Data

The following image below shows how to select the Excel file and then pass the filename and sheet name into the Excel.ReadFromFile node. Note that I have used a Code Block for the Excel Sheet Name but you can of course use the string node instead.Dynamo - Get Excel Data

The next stage is to remove the unwanted headers from the Excel data. The List.DropItems node is removing the first list. Note that list is a ‘nested’ list so will remove the [0] index as shown below.

Dynamo - Remove Headers from Excel

Next the transpose node is used to sort the data into the correct columns. The current data is stored as rows. The List.Transpose node converts rows to columns as shown below.Dynamo - Transpose the List

The next task is to get all the required data into separate lists so that we can later ‘feed’ this into the nodes to create the piles and also add data to each Revit Element. Dynamo has a node called List.GetItemAtIndex which gets the relevant data. In the below example I am getting the data from index 1 which is the Eastings Coordinates. Index 0 is the first column which is the Pile Number.Dynamo - Get Item At Index

This then leads me onto the next problem. By default the piles will be modelled from the origin (0,0,0) and Revit has a geometry limit of 20 miles which will clearly be broken by the large numbers (This project is around 200 miles from the OS base). In the below image you can see the ‘effect’ of geometry modelled a long way from the origin. This is referred to as graphical degradation and will affect the visual and also the accuracy of snaps etc.

Revit - degradation of Graphics

In the Project I have set the Project Base Point of a known Pile coordinateSet Project Base Point

I have then subtracted these values from the Eastings and Northings to give me coordinates relative to my project base point. In the below example I have the known Easting and Northing setting out point set. I then pass this value into a code block (marked with red boxes). The Code block is taking two variables and then subtracting the set out from the real coordinate. The nodes with the blue frames are the original coordinates.Dynamo - Transpose the Coordinates

The next step is to then model each pile based on a pre-defined Foundation Family. In this example I have created a round pile with an instance parameter to control the Diameter and another to control the depth. I have named this family ‘Concrete Pile’. The FamilyTypes node will list all loaded Families in your current Revit project. We then use the FamilyInstance.By.Coordinates node to generate each family from the two code blocks that generate the X and Y position and the third which is the ‘raw’ Z levels.Dynamo - Create the Piling

It is now time to make use of the ‘metadata’ such as the Pile Number and the Diameter by utilising the Element.SetParameterByName node. This needs the elements from our FamilyInstance.By.Coordinates node and also a string for the Parameter Name. Again I have used a Code Block for this example. In the image below I am using the instance parameter ‘Mark’ to read the Pile number and then add this into each Pile. This is then repeated for the Pile diameter and if required, the loading.

Dynamo - Setting the Pile Number

So anther interesting use for Dynamo in a structural project. I will produce a video tutorial to accompany these notes in the next day or so.

Enjoy,

LawrenceH

Autodesk Revit, Dynamo and Microsoft Excel for Drawing Sheet Creation

When Dynamo was first released for Autodesk Revit I assumed that this would just be used for computational geometry and complex architectural forms. However, I recently took a deeper look into Dynamo and started to realise that this has many uses for the everyday management of models, manipulation of data and the automation of typical time consuming tasks.

Dynamo Program and Revit Browser
I have created a small Dynamo program to create drawing sheets by reading data from an Excel Sheet and also generate parameters for each view to aid the view categorisation.  I was surprised at how quickly this visual ‘code’ came together! Let’s take a look at the process from the start.

First you need to make sure that you have Dynamo installed, this is installed automatically with Revit 2015 R2 and Revit 2016 but can be installed separately for older releases. The versions are changing very rapidly so in this tutorial I am using Dynamo V0.8.

In the future I can see Dynamo appearing in many other Autodesk applications as it has a very flexible and intuitive interface for the average Revit user that is not a coding expert.

Let’s now look at the steps required to create this visual application. This of course can be scaled up to meet more demanding procedures as required!

  1. Start a new Revit Project and then launch Dynamo from the Add-Ins Ribbon as shown below.Dynamo V0.8 Icon
  2. Start Microsoft Excel and create a document that contains the following columns, you can of course use your own names, numbers etc. Microsoft Excel is particularly good for this type of work as the drawing number can be created from specific entries in other columns.Microsoft Excel for Drawing Numbers
  3. Next you rename the Excel sheet to the following. Save the Excel file in a location of your choice.

Microsoft Excel Tabs

4. Switch to Dynamo and start a new Dynamo File.

Dynamo Application

5. You will now see the main Dynamo interface. The Dynamo application is split between     the node library on the left and the Workspace on the right. You will also notice that           Dynamo has a search function at the top of the node library for locating specific nodes.     Note that older versions of Dynamo may not display icons.

Dynamo Application screen

Start by searching for the File Path node as shown below.

Dynamo - File path Node

Click the File Path node once and it will be added to your workspace. The workspace can be zoomed and panned in the same way as Revit and you can drag the node to any location within the workspace.

Click the Browse button and locate your Microsoft Excel file. This node will allow you to select any type of file on your PC.

Dynamo - Browse

6. Next you add File from Path node. This should appear in the node library as it contains      the File Path search string. Click this node to add it to the workspace.

Dynamo - File from path Node

Next you ‘wire’ the nodes together as shown below. This is the primary method of building a visual program within Dynamo. At any time you can select the small grey square below the file node to display a watch window to show the current output.

Dynamo - Wire Nodes Together

7.  Using a similar process you can search for the Excel nodes and add                           Excel.ReadFromFile and a String Node. These should look like the following as shown below. The String entry is used to select the correct sheet in Microsoft Excel, in our case we named it ‘DRAWING NUMBERS’. Note the Watch window now shows the data from the Excel File. If any boxes show in Yellow then there is an error in your inputs.

Read Excel File Dynamo

8. Next we need to split the data into separate columns from the list. Note that the watch window shows [0], [1] and [2]. These are the column headers in Excel.

9. Type List.Transpose in the Search nodes and then add this to the workspace. Wire the Var[][] node to the List node. You then search and add a Number node and also the List.GetItemAtIndex.

Wire these together as shown below. Again click the grey Square box to show a Watch window of the data. Notice that this is now reading the first column of the Excel Sheet.

Dynamo - List.GetItemAtIndex

10. You then repeat this process to create three separate lists. Note that you can copy and paste the nodes for speed. Select the nodes with the Ctrl Key and then Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V and then rewire. Your workspace should now look similar to the below image.

Dynamo - List.GetItemAtIndex Copy and Paste

11. Next we create a new node to create the drawing sheets in your Revit project. In the search field type ‘Sheet By Name’ and then add the ‘ByNameNumberTitleblockAndView’ node to your workspace. You can then wire the Sheet Name and Sheet Number and connect these to the relevant lists as shown below.

Dynamo - Sheet By Name

12. The next step is to tell the node what titleblock to use. In this example we will use the default A1 Metric title block. Type ‘Family Types’ into the node search and add this to the work space. Also search for ‘Views’ and add this to the workspace as shown below. You can of course use your own settings for the title block and view. In this example I have used the North Elevation for the first view and A1 metric for the Title Block.

Dynamo - Create Sheets

That should be your code. The Running of this code is probably set to Automatic by default but you can select run in the bottom left of the Dynamo interface as shown below.

Dynamo - Run

I hope that this has shown how useful and simple Dynamo can be for automation of tedious operations. I will showcase some more uses for Dynamo in future tutorials.

LawrenceH

Revit Structure Tutorial – Structural Opening Families

Many of you will be using the Shaft Opening command within Revit to produce vertical openings within your models. Whilst being fairy efficient they have the following limitations:

  • Can Only be used to cut vertically
  • Can only cut floors
  • Analytical model cannot be adjusted

Perhaps the biggest issue here is the results on the analytical model and the fact that this analytical model cannot be adjusted. This can result in gaps from the floor slab to a structural wall as shown below. I would suggest that you set the analytical model of walls to the outside faces which will eliminate the gap.

Gap in Analysis model

To solve the other issues of placement I have created a tutorial video which explains how to create your own structural opening family with step by step instructions which can be viewed here.

http://youtu.be/xQuQLl0K310

We start by creating a Metric Generic model.rfa family template to develop the mail opening.

File - New - Family

  1. Create the parametric framework by using for Reference Lines to control the length and width of our opening. On the Create Ribbon click the Reference Line command and create the four Reference lines as shown below. The Reference Lines enable the shape handles to be displayed in a 3D view.

Opening Symbol - Reference Lines

2. Next you add two parameters to control the opening length and width. Create an Aligned dimension for the length and width and add the parameter as shown below.

Add Parameter

3. In the Parameter properties  box make sure that you select the Instance radio button to enable the shape handles and allow individual control of each structural opening.

Add Parameter Dialog Box

4. Repeat this for the Opening Width parameter. Your family should now look similar to the image below.

Opening Symbol - Reference Lines

Next you create the void extrusion. On the Create Ribbon click the Void Extrusion command as shown below.

Void Extrusion

Sketch a Rectangle and lock all four padlocks to ensure that the geometry is constrained to the Reference Lines as shown below.

Rectangle Constrained

Click the green tick to finish the void extrusion. In the Project Browser switch to the front view and align the top and bottom of the Void Extrusion to the Reference Lines as shown below. You will also need to create a parameter for the opening height; this will also be an instance parameter.

Constri

5. Next you configure the Family Categories & Parameters, on the Create Ribbon click the Family Categories & Parameters command. To ensure that you can use the void extrusion in any plane you select the Work Plane-Based option. The void will not be able to cut families unless the Cut with voids when loaded option is switched on. Lastly you can uncheck the Always vertical command to enable the family to be placed on any plane.

Family Categories & Parameters

The main part of the structural opening is now complete; you will now need to create a 2D opening symbol that will appear on each section or elevation that projects the opening. Save your Family as Structural Opening.rfa. Do not close the file as you will load your 2D detail into this family in later steps.

2D opening Symbol

6. We start by creating a Metric Detail Item.rfa family template to develop the 2D opening detail.

File - New - Family

7. Create the four Reference Planes as shown below. I have mirrored the reference planes to initially make the planes symmetrical.

Reference Planes

8. Next you create two Aligned Dimensions and then add instance parameters to control the 2D detail called ‘Opening Length’ and ‘Opening Width’. Both of these parameters need to be instance parameters. Your family should now look similar to the image below.

Opening Length and Width Parameters

Next you create a sub category to allow control of line weight and visibility. On the Manage Ribbon click the Object Styles command.

Object Styles Icon

In the Object Style dialog box create a new Subcategory named ‘Structural Opening Symbols’ and click Ok on both dialog boxes.

Object Style Dialog Box

9. On the create ribbon click the Line command to start the place line mode.

Detail Line Icon

Draw the two diagonal Detail Lines as shown in the image below and ensure that the Structural opening sub category is selected. There is no need to lock the detail lines to the Reference Planes as Revit will assume that the lines should be constrained to the Reference Planes.

Strcutural Opening Sub Category

Flex the family by selecting the Family Types command on the Create Ribbon to check that the Detail Lines respond to the changes. Save the Detail Component as 2D Structural Opening Symbol.rfa.

10. Next you load your 2D Structural Opening Symbol into your Structural Opening.rfa. On the Create Ribbon click the Load into Project command as shown below.

Load into project Command

If the Load into Projects Dialog box shows then ensure that you select the Structural Opening.rfa. Depending on your last view you may get a warning, you can ignore this.

11. In the Project Browser make the Floor Plans, Ref.Level view active. On the Annotate Ribbon Click the Detail Component tool as shown below.

Detail Component Button

You should now be able to place your 2D Structural Opening Symbol onto the active view. Make sure that you lock the 2D Detail to the Reference Lines.

Your Family is now ready to test!

When inserting the family into a project you use the Place Component command on the Structure Ribbon. It is also worth remembering that you can control the placement mode to be on a Face or on the active Work Plane. Remember that a YouTube Video is published at:

http://youtu.be/xQuQLl0K310

Place on Face or Workplane

lawrenceH

Revit 2015 Tutorial – Creating Filters for Structural Modelling and Documentation

Link to YouTube Video: http://youtu.be/CridRbzEVQ8

In this tutorial we will take a look at the use and creation of filters that can be used specifically for structural consultants, as usual there is a link at the top of the post to a YouTube video showing the various techniques used. If you are currently not utilising filters within Revit Structure then these can dramatically improve the quality, speed, consistency and appearance of your models and associated drawings. There are many uses for filters within a structural model which can assist with some of the following design and modelling tasks:

  • Floor Loading Diagrams
  • Construction Methods
  • Analysis tasks and results
  • Piling and Foundations

In the below image you can see an example of filters applied to a plan and 3D view showing the construction methods used in concrete structures. This data can of course be used in a wide range of outputs including schedules.

Revit Filters - Wall Construction example

Another method below is showing the analysis state of a steel framing model, the engineers simply state if a member is designed by checking a box in the instance parameters of the relevant structural members, a filter then colours the model based on this selection.

Filter and Override working

Nearly all of these filters rely on the use of Shared Parameters and Project Parameters which will also be included within this tutorial.

In this tutorial we will look at adding a designed parameter into structural objects and then creating the various filters that are required. This technique can then be used for many other applications as desired.

  1. Creating the Shared Parameter File (SPF)

The first step is to create the shared parameter. This would normally be added to your existing shared parameter file but for this example we will create a new one.

On the Manage ribbon click the shared parameter button as shown below.

Shared Parmaeter Icon

In the Edit Shared Parameter dialog click the Create Button as shown below.

Shared Parmeter Create Button

Save the Shared Parameter File somewhere safe as you may need to reference this file later to add additional items etc. In this example I am saving this to the desktop. Note that this is simply a text file.

Save the SPF file

The next stage is to create a group where the new parameter will be located. Click the New command and Label the group as Analysis as shown below.SPF - Create New Group

Next you click the New Parameter button as shown below and create a new parameter labelled ‘Designed’, the discipline should be Common and the Type of Parameter should be set to Yes/No. Click OK to both dialog boxes.Create the Designed Parameter

This has now created a shared parameter but we now need to tell Revit what to do with this parameter, this is done with a Project Parameter.

  1. Creating the Project Parameters

Next we select the categories that we would like to use our ‘Designed’ parameter in, for example you may want to use this for Structural Framing, Structural Columns, Floors etc. On the Manage Ribbon click the Project Parameters Icon as shown below.

Project Parameter Icon

In the Project Parameters Dialog click the Add button and then select the Shared Parameter radio button and then the Select button as shown in the image below.

Parameter Properties Dialog Box

Select the ‘Designed’ Parameter and then click Ok.Shared Parameter 2

Next you specify the parameter to be an instance as each structural member requires its own instance of the ‘Designed’ parameter. This parameter should be grouped under Structural Analysis. You then select all the Categories that this parameter should appear in; in this example we will select Floors, Structural Columns, Structural Foundations & Structural Framing. Click OK to the Parameter Properties dialog box.Parmaeter Properties Dialog Box 2

You will now see that our ‘Designed’ parameter in ‘burnt’ into any new or existing member within this project. You would ideally add this to your project template to ensure that all future projects have this parameter embedded. It is also worth noting that it is possible to add two identical Shared Parameters with differing data so be aware of this!Revit Structural Framining - Designed Parameter

  1. Filters and View Templates

 A View Filter will simply allow control of a view in Revit by utilising common properties and then applying colours, patterns and shading combinations to identify objects.

You now create a filter and save this into a view template for use in other views. Select an existing 3D view and draw a few columns, beams etc. to test the filter.

On the View Ribbon, Click the Visibility/Graphics Icon as shown below or use the shortcut VV.

Visibility Graphics Button

You will now see the Visibility/Graphics Override dialog as show below. Click the Filter Tab

Visibility Graphics Overrides dialog - Filter Tab

In the Filters Tab you can now select the Edit/New button to create or edit existing filters that you may have.

Visibility Graphics Overrides dialog - Edit-New

The Filter Dialog Box

 The Edit/New Filter dialog is Split into three zones, the first zone is for the creation and management of new and existing filters. Here you can copy and rename filters to create new versions. In the image below you can see that I have already created several parameters to control shading and hatching of a floor slab for loading diagrams, this has been simply copied from existing parameters.

The central zone allows the selection and filtering of categories, ensures that you only have the Structural Filter selected to reduce the quantity of items in the Parameter list.

The right hand zone is used to define the rules for filters, notice that you have three filters so that numerical zones can be created for structural loading values and other similar scenarios.

Revit Filter Dialog

Click the New Filter Button and name the Filter ‘Designed’. Click OK.

Filter Name Dialog

In the Categories Section, select Floors, Structural Columns, Structural Foundations & Structural Framing. You may want to set just the structural category to make the list shorter. In the right hand side of the dialog you can now select our Designed parameter, set the Filter to Equals and the value to Yes. The Filter Dialog should now look similar to the image below. Click OK

Filters Configured

Next you add this filter and configure the required graphical overrides, click the Add button and select the Designed Filter.

You will now have complete control over the visibility, colours of lines and patterns both in Projection and Cut, see the image below.

Revit Design Parameter added to Dialog

You now add a pattern and colour to the graphical override to show all designed members with a solid fill in green as shown below. Click OK to the Dialog box.

Adding Colour and Patterns to the Filter

The filter will now be operating within your 3D view. Make sure that the view is shaded to see this override; if the view is set to realistic the filter will not override the graphics. Your view should now look similar to the image below.

Filter and Override working

  1. Creating and Applying a View Template

You may have more than one view that you want to utilise theses filter within your project so the best approach is to create a View Template from the current view and then edit this template so that it applies the filter and a visual style to the selected views.

On the View Ribbon Select the View Templates drop down and then select the Create Template from Current View Icon as shown below.

Create Template from Current View Icon

In the View Template Dialog box you will now notice that the Designed Template has been created based on the settings of the current view. This has captured all the settings including the visibility status, scale, detail level etc. You will need to uncheck all the check boxes under the Include column and just select V/G Override Filters and Model Display. Unfortunately there is not a check or uncheck all option here!

Link to YouTube Video: http://youtu.be/CridRbzEVQ8