Tutorial – Piling with Revit 2019, Dynamo and AutoCAD Civil 3D 2019

In this tutorial we will look at a simple method to generate piling from a finished ground level to a rock stratum from borehole data. Most of you will now have access to the Autodesk AEC collection but, I often find that people tend to use just one or two tools from this collection which doesn’t return value or efficiency. In this workflow we will utilise Revit 2019, Civil 3D 2019 and Dynamo.

Revit and Civil3D Piling workflow

This workflow can also be achieved using Dynamo and Revit to find the intersections between the piling and the surfaces, but this can take quite a while to execute on large datasets, is computationally expensive and will invariably crash the machine.

Piling to Rock

So, presented below is another option if you want to move into the use of Civil 3D. We will start in AutoCAD Civil 3D 2019. In Civil 3D you can either create the surfaces from points or from an existing set of contours a little like the workflow in Revit. We then place the pile locations as AutoCAD points and convert these points into Civil 3D points. The Civil 3D points can then obtain levels from surfaces. The group of points are then exported as a text file.

Export Points

The next stage is to use Dynamo to organise and prepare these points for use in Revit. The Dynamo script will first open the text file and create an ordered list from the data.

Dynamo Section 1

Once this list is created, we then get the Project Base Point from Revit. The PBP is set to the local setting out point. This is then used to create the local coordinates that Revit will need to set out the piles.

Dynamo Section 2

Because the top and bottom points are in the same list, we can use dynamo to sort the points on the X coordinates (the X and Y value will be the same for the top and bottom point). This section of the script separates the Eastings, Northings and Levels and transforms the coordinates to local grid suitable for Revit.

Dynamo Section 3

The last part then creates the Revit elements and sets the depth parameter to send the piles to the rock level.

Dynamo Section 4

Here is the final layout in Revit.

Revit Piling Layout

Obviously, we can directly use the coordinates to create a piling schedule and use the point numbers to number each pile.

Hope that has been useful,

Lawrence H

 

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Webinar – The AEC Collection for Structural Engineers

Just a quick post to let you know that I will be presenting a webinar session this Friday (28th September @ 10am). You will see some interesting AEC Collection workflows for the following topics:

  • Steel Spaceframe
  • Retaining Walls
  • Structural Steel details

Join us with the link below.

The Recording can be found here:

https://www.excitech.co.uk/Insights/Thought-Leadership/Webinar-Recordings/AEC-Workflow-for-Structural-Engineers

Once on the page click the  link marked in red and fill in the form.

Excitech Webinar Video

Here are some images of the workflows we will be using on Friday!

SpaceFrame

Retaining Wall

Structural Steelwork

Hope to see you!

LawrenceH

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Revit 2019 Tutorial Part 2 – Creating Roof Bracing Systems

In part 1 of this tutorial we looked at the creation of vertical bracing systems using Revit 2019, in this part we will focus on roof bracing systems in Revit 2019.

Cover Image

Roof bracing tends to get a little more complex than vertical bracing due to compound angles and complex connection configurations. Revit has some good tools to make the placement of roof bracing easier. We will also cover some tips and tricks for the representation of bracing in plan.

As mentioned in the part 1 of the tutorial, you should always use the dedicated brace tool rather than the beam command as shown below.

Revit 2019 Bracing Commnad

It is easier to add the roof bracing in a 3D view. It is very important to ensure that you have the 3D snapping option checked on the options bar as indicated below.

Revit 2019 Brace 3D Snapping

You can then roughly sketch your bracing configuration by snapping to the top of each rafter as shown below. Don’t worry about getting the exact position, this will be set in a later step. Do not snap to the column.

Revit 2019 3D Snapping to beam

The bracing will automatically be placed on the centre line of the rafter, but the analytical model will automatically adjust to the top of steel.

Bracing on Centreline

When a brace is selected you have the option of setting the location via a ratio or a distance along the beam. The example below shows the start of the brace set 300mm from the column and the end of the brace set to 5000mm. The plan shows the position of the brace.

Bracing Properties P1

Brace Plan Distance

Another method of placing the bracing is to use a ratio. The ratio at the start of the beam is 0 and the end of the beam is 1. In the example below a brace is placed 30mm from the start of the first rafter and then at a ratio of 0.25 (25%) along the second rafter. This value will remain parametric if the length of the rafter changes.

Bracing Properties P2

Brace Plan Distance 1

PLAN REPRESENTATION OF BRACING

In part 1 of the tutorial you will have seen that plan bracing is represented in a course level of detail with an offset dashed line. This is perfect for vertical bracing but not so good for roof bracing! In the image below, you can see the offset showing in the plan.

Plan Bracing Revit 2019 - Offset

This is due to the plan representation showing a parallel line and offset. However, we will use the Kicker brace symbol to represent the bracing in plan.

Revit 2019 Bracing Settings

To set the bracing to kicker bracing, in the Properties Palette, set the structural Usage to Kicker Bracing as shown below.

Properties - Kicker Bracing

You can of course edit the line pattern and the symbol for kicker bracing.

M Brace kicker family

In the example shown below I simply edited the line pattern in the object styles for kicker bracing and deleted the X in the M_Connection-Brace-Kicker.rfa.

Plan Bracing Revit 2019 - Kicker

ADDING STRUCTURAL CONNECTIONS IN REVIT 2019

You can of course add some basic connections in Revit 2019, but you must make sure that you create the bracing first and then add the relevant connections. If you add connections before the steel model is complete you will not be able to 3D snap to the rafter.

Revit 2019 bracing connection

The below image shows the Double Tube Bracing connection dialog box. The 3D representation of the connection is almost identical to the advance steel connection. However, of you require fabrication documents, accurate cutting lists, constructability verification and CNC code then Advance Steel can be used.

Revit 2019 bracing connection Dkialog Box

Advance Steel can create full fabrication documents and details. The image below shows the same frame in Advance Steel. This has been transferred using the Advance Steel extension which will keep both models synchronised.

Advance Steel 2019

In the images below you can see assembly drawings that are automatically created for the rafters and haunches.

Advance Steel Fabrication Details

Here is a list of plates and surface areas for galvanising.

Advance Steel Plate List

Finally the CNC data is generated for the automated drilling and cutting of each item in the model.

Advance Steel NC Files

LawrenceH

 

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Revit 2019 Tutorial Part 1 – Adding Vertical Bracing Systems

I still find many people asking what the best methods are for adding bracing to steel models, some are still using beams to try and model bracing, others still get into a bit of a mess with vertical bracing, more struggle with the representation on drawings.

I thought it was about time I created a tutorial on this subject, covering both horizontal and vertical bracing as well as some typical connections for adding those all-important details.

So first we need to look at some of the basics. In the images below, you can see Vertical, Horizontal and Roof Bracing.

Revit Bracing Examples

Creating Vertical Bracing

When creating vertical bracing it is best to create a framing elevation. The framing elevation creates an elevation on the frame a few hundred millimetres deep and sets a working plane for the bracing.

Framing Elevation

You must use the dedicated brace command to efficiently add bracing.

Bracing

You can roughly sketch the bracing that you require and then use the Properties Palette to fine tune the exact location of the bracing.

In the example below, you can see some vertical X-bracing, note that the start and end attachments are attached to the correct levels and you also have the option of adding offsets from each of these levels.

Vertical Bracing with PropertiesIn this example we have used Equal Angle to create the bracing. Both angles are in the same plane and hence clash.

This can easily be resolved by using the y Offset Value on each member. The analytical line remains centred, but the physical elements will be located correctly.

Offset Bracing in the Y Axis

The bracing is automatically represented in a plan view and can be tagged. The standard in the UK is to show a parallel line on the outside for bracing above and a parallel line on the inside for bracing below.

Plan Bracing

You can control the type of representation and spacing in the Structural Settings dialog box.

Structural Settings Bracing

Finally, if you want to tidy up the bracing and make the drawings look a little better you can either use 2D detail components to represent a connection or use the connection tools to add 3D connections.

Revit 2D and 3D Bracing

LawrenceH

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Tutorial – Transferring Pile caps from Revit to Robot using Dynamo

Many of you may already know that if you would like to design a pile cap for punching shear with Robot you need to manually model the pile cap as a panel and then manually set up all the piles and the footprint of the column. This can be a real pain when the geometry changes!

Pile Cap Punching Shear Robot A better approach is to unleash the power of Dynamo to help model the analytical panels and nodes that can be used by Robot Structural Analysis. You will first need to make sure that the package ‘Structural Analysis for Dynamo’ has been installed.

Structural Analysis for Dynamo Package

You will then see a range of nodes that allow you to take Revit geometry into Dynamo and then create Autodesk Robot Structural Analysis elements. The main idea behind the process is to take the top surfaces of the pile caps and then build panels from these in Robot. We then take the footprint of the column and the pile diameters and model these as panel openings. In the example I have used you can see the Revit model and the panels and nodes that are created in Robot.

revit robot pile Caps

If there is enough interest I may create a full tutorial video for this process but if you can’t wait to test this out then you can download a large image of the Dynamo graph from here:

Dynamo Graph as Image

 

LawrenceH

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RC Detailing Tutorial – Revit 2019

In this short tutorial we will look at the reinforcement of a simple column and foundation. The reinforcement is modelled manually to show you how reinforcement bar is placed in elements. We then schedule the reinforcement to BS8666:2005 and produce a simple drawing.

COLUMN DETAIL

Here is the bending schedule shown below.

RC Bending Schedule

The tutorial is using the Excitech Revit RC template but everything else is standard Revit 2019.

Hope you enjoy the tutorial?

 

LawrenceH

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Revit 2019 – New Steel Features

Well, it’s that time of year again to review the new features of Revit, seems to come round so fast. As I did last year, I will review the steel and concrete features as separate blog posts and videos as we have a raft of new features to look at!

New Steel Detailing Ribbon

If you would like to jump directly to the steel video then here is the link.

New Steel Ribbon

Autodesk are further extending the Level of detail that can be presented by adding specific modelling tools to extend the power of structural connections and end treatments. You now have dedicated tools to create notches, saw cuts, holes and chamfers and rounds to steelwork. This allows for a greater Level of Detail when modelling and these features can be directly linked to Advance Steel for full Automatic fabrication documents.

Revit 2019 - Steel Detailing Ribbon

The use of these new tools will depend on the need for modelling to this level of detail. For example, bridges may require a greater Level of detail but a traditional steel frame modelled by an engineering consultant may not require any connection details, these will be added by the fabricator.

A particularly nice feature is the ability to use a standard connection and then break the connection into the fabrication elements such as plates, bolts, cuts etc. This allows for easy modifications to connections and the ability to create your own connections.

Revit 2019 - Customise and Break Connection

For a detailed look at each tool check out my video at the top of this post.

Enjoy,

LawrenceH

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